The Micropalaeontological Society

All posts in Palynology

Microfossil Image Competition & Calendar 2018

Comments Off on Microfossil Image Competition & Calendar 2018
Buy a Calendar

The Micropalaeontological Society is delighted to announce the winner of this year’s Micropalaeontology Image Competition!

The overall image winner was submitted by Adam David Woodhouse from the University of Leeds, with his beautiful image of the planktonic foraminifera Acarinina praetopilensis from the Eocene equatorial Pacific. The image clearly displays the heavy recrystallistion of the foram test and the adherence of calcareous nannofossils with large muricae projecting through coccolith debris. The main image diameter c. 150 µm, and the image to be used within the calendar (August) will include an image of the complete foram (c. 400 µm diameter) for context. Not only does Adam win the competition’s first prize of €200, but also has his image included on the front cover of out TMSoc2018 Calendar (see above)!

On behalf of the Society we would like to congratulate Adam on his success. Eleven additional winners were selected from the fantastic submissions, and are on display below! A wide variety of microfossils and imaging techniques have been championed this year, and we are already looking forward to next year’s competition.

The twelve winning images have been incorporated into the 2018 Micropalaeontology Calendar, which will soon be available for purchase! Like last year, the calendar has been produced in spiral-bound A4 format with one page per month.

A full list of the winners can be found below:

1. Adam David Woodhouse , University of Leeds – overall winner! SEM image is of the foram Acarinina praetopilensis, displaying heavy recrystallisation & coccolith debris
2. Ulrike Hoff, University of Norway – Holocene Diatoms from Two-Yurts Lake, Kamchatka, Russia.
3. Susan Richardson, Wilkes Honors College, Florida Atlantic Uni – thin section of foram Schwagerina nelsoni.
4. Marie-Béatrice Forel, Le Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle – Ostracod Cytherelloidea from the lagoon of Rangiroa atoll, French Polynesia.
5. Septriandi A. Chan, King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals – Elphidium steinkern, from Middle Miocene of Saudi Arabia.
6. María José Leaño, Paleolab, Microscopy Center, Universidad de los andes Bogota – SEM of Silybum marianum (milk thistle) pollen
7. Elaine Mawbey, University of Bristol – diatom Arachnoidiscus ehrenberg, from Bransfield Strait, West Antarctic Penninsula.
8. Haruka Takagi, Uni of Tokyo – Globigerinoides sacculifer & photosymbiotic dinoflagellates. From Sagami Bay, Japan.
9. Lynz Fox, NHM London – Cracked Orbulina universa test revealing juvenile stages within. From Indian Ocean.
10. Samantha Gibbs, NOCS University of Southampton – Hand-made coccolithophores of Coccolithus braarudii.
11. Roger C. Wagner & Debbie Powell, University of Delaware, USA – Assortment of radiolarian SEMs collected from the seas off Barbados, dating to the Cenozoic Era.
12. Odysseas Archontikis, Département Sciences de la Terre, Université de Lille & Faculty of Geology and Geoenvironment, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece – SEM of diatom Asterolampra marylandica, from Cretan Sea (Med)


Winning Images
005
006
007
008
009
010
011
012
001
002
Schwagerina nelsoni
004

Buy a Calendar

Select postage option:



Pricing Table

 

  • Post to UK
  • £9
  • Post to EU
  • £10
  • Post to outside EU
  • £12

Lyell Meeting 2018: Mass extinctions, 8th March 2018, London

Comments Off on Lyell Meeting 2018: Mass extinctions, 8th March 2018, London

The study of mass extinctions is one of the most interdisciplinary research areas within Earth and environmental sciences. Recent, major advances have come from a broad spectrum of fields, including atmospheric modelling, high-precision age dating, volcanology, geochemistry, stratigraphy and palaeontology.

The 2018 Lyell Meeting aims to highlight these achievements and showcases the improved understanding we now have of the great environmental catastrophes of the past. The Meeting aims to encompass the full spectrum of crises seen in the Phanerozoic fossil record.

The 2018 Lyell Meeting provides a platform to assess the current stratigraphic and geochemical records of environmental change during mass extinction events and the role of atmospheric climate modelling in understanding the causes of the crises. The goal is to evaluate the relative importance of environmental changes in major episodes of species extinctions, and to further explore the mechanisms that link these proximal kill mechanisms to the ultimate drivers, such as large igneous province eruptions and meteorite impacts.

This will be a rare opportunity to hear research developments happening in diverse disciplines applied to all mass extinction events.

Abstract deadline: 1st December 2017

More info at The Geological Society webpage

 

Change of Journal Publisher (Copernicus Publications)

Comments Off on Change of Journal Publisher (Copernicus Publications)

We are delighted to announce The Micropalaeontological Society has signed a new deal with Copernicus Publications (http://publications.copernicus.org) to publish the Journal of Micropalaeontology (JoM). After many fantastic years with the Geological Society Publishing House (GSPH), the Society’s contract with GSPH was due for renewal at the end of 2017 and through negotiations with a number of potential publishers (including GSPH) we aimed to increase Open Access publishing. After considerable discussions the committee decided that Copernicus would be our first choice as publisher of JoM from 1st January 2018 onwards, for a three-year period in the first instance. This means that JoM is now the first entirely Open Access journal in micropalaeontology. This arrangement does not affect our agreement with GSPH for the delivery of TMS Special Publications. The new platform is now set up within the Copernicus website and can be viewed here:

http://journal-of-micropalaeontology.net/index.html

Manuscript submission is now open, and we have developed a promotion for authors without funding that will start in 2018 (see below)!

There is a lot of information to disseminate that relates to: (1) how the new journal approach differs to GSPH, and (2) how this new model will be of benefit to TMS members and indeed our micropalaeontology community as a whole. Here, we will try and summarise many of the key changes that will result from this new contract with Copernicus. In addition, there is a pdf of ‘Frequently Asked Questions’ (FAQ’s), attached to this email.

More information and FAQ download:

Microfossil Image Competition 2017

Comments Off on Microfossil Image Competition 2017
Image Comp Poster 2017

2017 will be the third year The Micropalaeontological Society runs their Microfossil Image Competition. The outstanding success of the last two years is reflected by the creation of our 2015, 2016 and 2017 Micropalaeontology Calendars. Each year, the calendars have required two print runs and have sold out! A summary of the winning images can be found here (20142015 2016), whilst a Flickr archive of all submitted images can be found here. Read more

TMS Palynology Group meeting, 15th June 2017, Liverpool

Comments Off on TMS Palynology Group meeting, 15th June 2017, Liverpool

From People to Oil Rock: Palynomorphs are the key

To endeavour a cross-discipline meeting between palynologists, archaeologists, geologists

Preliminary programme

Kick-off/registration/poster up/coffee-tea 10-11.15
11.15-11.30: Welcome
11.30-12.15: von Post Lecture: Jennifer O’Keefe (Morehead University, USA)
Filling in the gaps: Palynology at the birthplace of North American Paleontology
12.30-13.30: Lunch-Poster session
1.30-3.00 Talks (6 talks, 15’ each)
Coffee break
3.30-5.00 (6 talks, 15’ each)

Local organising committee:
Fabienne Marret, Rachael Lem, Karen Halsall
Overall organising committee:
Matthew Pound, Manuel Vieira

 

Deadline for registering to the Palynology Group Meeting 10th June. See form below.

 

Microfossil Image Competition & Calendar 2017

Comments Off on Microfossil Image Competition & Calendar 2017
0-calendar-cover-2017

 

Buy a Calendar

View all image entries in our Flickr album.

The Micropalaeontological Society is delighted to announce the winner of this year’s Micropalaeontology Image Competition!

Maxence Delaine, Lille 1 University, France won the competition with this beautiful image of two testate amoebae:  Difflugia pyriformis (L), Difflugia viscidula (R). These testate amoebae on display typically have a length of between 150-300 µm and are built by the organism using recycled mineral grains. The specimens were sampled in a small river of Brittany (Rau de l’étang du Loc’h, Peumerit-Quintin, France). The winning image is a composition of 2 pictures obtained with the SEM of the Laboratoire d’Océanologie et de Géosciences (UMR 8187) at Lille 1 University. The 2 pictures were subsequently combined into a single one, which was then processed in order to obtain this final colour enhanced SEM picture. Read more

Microfossil Image Competition 2016 – View album on Flickr

Comments Off on Microfossil Image Competition 2016 – View album on Flickr

All of the fantastic entries into the Microfossil Image Competition & Calendar 2017 can be viewed here, and are also available on Flickr.

Please do not use these images without the authors permission. If you are interested in obtaining high resolution versions of any image please contact the Secretary, who will direct your enquiry to the appropriate person.

Read more

Lyell Meeting 2017: Sticking Together: microbes and their role in forming sediments, 7th March 2017, London

Comments Off on Lyell Meeting 2017: Sticking Together: microbes and their role in forming sediments, 7th March 2017, London

 

At The Geological Society, Burlington House

Sedimentology and geomorphology have traditionally been seen as fields in which physical, and sometimes chemical, processes dominate completely. Even in settings where biological processes have long been recognised, for example in marine carbonates, focus has been almost entirely on metazoans. This is curious, because microbial communities since the Pre-Cambrian, have suffused all sedimentary environments on Earth, and at least half global biomass is prokaryotic. Are all these microbes simply bystanders? Recent research has hinted that they are key agents in controlling an impressive range of processes and products in sedimentology, bringing the fields of microbe palaeontology and bio-sedimentology into intimate alignment. The implications are fundamental, and pose the question “are large-scale sedimentological features actually microbial trace fossils?”. Read more

Joint Meeting of TSOP-AASP- ICCP, 14 September 2016, Houston

Comments Off on Joint Meeting of TSOP-AASP- ICCP, 14 September 2016, Houston

DATES:

Saturday, September 17 through Saturday, September 14, 2016

LOCATION:

The Magnolia Hotel, Houston TX, USA

DESCRIPTION:

Joint Meeting of The Society for Organic Petrography, AASP-The Palynological Society and The

International Commission for Coal and Organic Petrography. The purpose of this joint meeting is to bring

together a diverse group of scientists to discuss the close relationships between organic petrology and

palynology, to foster thoughtful discussion and address issues that may be of benefit to furthering the

respective sciences. Key themes to be addressed during joint activities include source rock/source-rock

reservoir resource assessment, microscope methods of characterizing microporosity, coal

characterization, and palynofacies/kerogen.

MEETING URL:

http://palynology.org/home-page- 2016-joint- meeting-tsop- aasp-iccp/

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Dr. Thomas D. Demchuk, tdemchuk@swbell.net

TSOPAASP 2008ICCP TM