The Micropalaeontological Society

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Microfossil Image Competition & Calendar 2017

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View all image entries in our Flickr album.

The Micropalaeontological Society is delighted to announce the winner of this year’s Micropalaeontology Image Competition!

Maxence Delaine, Lille 1 University, France won the competition with this beautiful image of two testate amoebae:  Difflugia pyriformis (L), Difflugia viscidula (R). These testate amoebae on display typically have a length of between 150-300 µm and are built by the organism using recycled mineral grains. The specimens were sampled in a small river of Brittany (Rau de l’étang du Loc’h, Peumerit-Quintin, France). The winning image is a composition of 2 pictures obtained with the SEM of the Laboratoire d’Océanologie et de Géosciences (UMR 8187) at Lille 1 University. The 2 pictures were subsequently combined into a single one, which was then processed in order to obtain this final colour enhanced SEM picture. Read more

Foram Nanno 2017, 19th-21st June 2017, Birmingham

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Foram Nanno 2017
Registrations and abstract submission will open on March 1st, 2017 and have to be completed before midnight on 31st May, 2017. Late registration will not be possible.

The TMS is delighted to announce that the next Foraminifera and Nannofossil spring meeting will be hosted by the University of Birmingham on the 19-21st June 2017.The program will encompass oral presentations and extended posters sessions, an icebreaker reception in the Lapworth Museum of Geology, a conference dinner, as well as an optional field excursion and thematic workshops on Monday 19th June.

The theme for this year’s event is “Life in a Changing Ocean”. We strongly encourage submissions that address the vulnerability and resilience of foraminifera and coccolithophores to environmental change, past and present, as well as the interaction between changing marine environments and evolutionary processes and patterns over long timescales.

As always we will place a high value on the contributions made by early career researchers. This year we include:

– Two extended afternoon poster sessions with refreshments (3.30pm – 6pm).

– Dedicated elevator pitch to the whole conference for all early career poster presentation (PhD / post-doc) – 1 slide, 2 minutes.

– Oral presentation sessions with a mix of career stages.

– Prizes for best PhD and best post-doc oral and poster presentations.

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1st International Summer School on Benthic Foraminifera, July 2nd-7th 2017, Angers

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The LPG-BIAF is delighted to announce that the first FRESCO Summer school will be held on July 2nd to 7th, 2017 at Angers University (France).

The course is intended for students/researchers interested in Living benthic foraminifera in coastal environments

If you want to apply to the summer school, please complete the form and email it to fresco@univ-angers.fr before the 3rd of March, 2017. Read more

Foram-Nanno 2017, 19th-21st June, Birmingham

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SAVE THE DATE – TMS Foram & Nanno meeting 19th-21st June 2017 at the University of Birmingham, UK

We are delighted that we are able to welcome you all to the University of Birmingham from the 19th – 21st June 2017 for the Foraminiferal and Calcareous Nannofossil meeting. The proposed schedule is below
  • Sunday 18th and Monday 19th June – Workshops (Saturday if necessary)
  • Evening of Monday 19th June – Meeting Icebreaker
  • Tuesday 20th and Wednesday 21st June – Main Meeting
  • Thursday 22nd June – Field-trip
If you would like to run a workshop prior to this meeting then please get in touch with Kirsty for foram related queries (k.m.edgar@bham.ac.uk) or Tom Dunkley Jones for nanno queries (t.dunkleyjones@bham.ac.uk) to discuss arrangements. Please note that we have >20 each of stereo light microscopes and transmitted light microscopes available for use if you would like to run a practical workshop.
More details to follow later this year.
Best wishes, Kirsty and Tom
Your 2017 TMS F&N conference organisers

FORAMS 2018 – June 2018, Scotland

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Download the FORAMS 2018 flyer here:

http://www.tmsoc.org/forams-2018/

Download the FORAMS 2nd circular here:

International Symposium on Foraminifera, Edinburgh, Scotland. June 2018.

More information and flyer coming soon!

Visit the Facebook Page: www.facebook.com/FORAMS2018

 

Microfossil Image Competition 2016 – View album on Flickr

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All of the fantastic entries into the Microfossil Image Competition & Calendar 2017 can be viewed here, and are also available on Flickr.

Please do not use these images without the authors permission. If you are interested in obtaining high resolution versions of any image please contact the Secretary, who will direct your enquiry to the appropriate person.

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Lyell Meeting 2017: Sticking Together: microbes and their role in forming sediments, 7th March 2017, London

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At The Geological Society, Burlington House

Sedimentology and geomorphology have traditionally been seen as fields in which physical, and sometimes chemical, processes dominate completely. Even in settings where biological processes have long been recognised, for example in marine carbonates, focus has been almost entirely on metazoans. This is curious, because microbial communities since the Pre-Cambrian, have suffused all sedimentary environments on Earth, and at least half global biomass is prokaryotic. Are all these microbes simply bystanders? Recent research has hinted that they are key agents in controlling an impressive range of processes and products in sedimentology, bringing the fields of microbe palaeontology and bio-sedimentology into intimate alignment. The implications are fundamental, and pose the question “are large-scale sedimentological features actually microbial trace fossils?”. Read more