The Micropalaeontological Society

All posts in Events

6th Silicofossil and Palynology Joint Meeting 2022

Comments Off on 6th Silicofossil and Palynology Joint Meeting 2022

The Micropalaeontological Society Silicofossil and Palynology Joint meeting will take place on the 30th of June to the 1st of July 2022 at Northumbria University, UK. Virtual attendance through Microsoft Teams will also be an option.

Abstracts on any aspect of palynology or silicofossil research are welcome. Presentations will be either full talks (12 minutes presenting, 3 minutes for questions), or lightening talks (4 minutes presenting, 1 minute for questions). Preference will be given to PhD and MSc students to enable them to present talks in a friendly and supportive atmosphere.

Refreshments and lunch will be provided on both days of the conference for in-person attendees. A social event on the evening of the 30th June is planned for in-person attendees, with further details to follow (cost likely to be between £20-35 pp).

Abstract submission and registration are open from the 8th of April to the 27th of May and can be accessed on the following link: https://forms.gle/K8oUkJixpbzKNaVz7

Once you have filled in the registration form, please pay the registration fee using the options below

Registration fee is £40 for non-TMS members, £25 for TMS full members and £15 for students, retired TMS members and participants from lower income countries.

Please select your category

Any question can be asked to: tmspaly@gmail.com or tmsocsilico@gmail.com

ISO 19

Comments Off on ISO 19

The French Ostracodologists’ Group and the International Research Group on Ostracoda are pleased to invite you to attend the 19th International Symposium on Ostracoda that will be held in Lyon at the University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 from July 18th-22nd 2022.

Hopefully the pandemic situation in France will be better in July than it is at the moment (France accounted for about 10% of the World covid cases this week…). The ISO meetings are rare occasions for ostracodologists of different countries, disciplines, generations to meet and discuss so we’ll do anything we can to maintain the meeting in person.

We would like to strongly encourage the younger generation (MScs, PhDs, Postdocs) to come and present their work in front of our welcoming community. The IRGO will provide at least two travel grants (up to 1000€) to students that have no other source of funds for attending the conference. The two best student abstracts will be selected by the advisory board of SF*IRGO (https://www.support-irgo.net/advisory-board/) for the attribution of these grants and the laureates will be notified on April 30th the latest.

We also know that not every one of you will be able to attend the meeting. Those participants that know, or expect, that they will be unable to attend in person because of travel, health or mobility restrictions will still be able to present their work and follow the conference online. If their abstracts are accepted, they will be invited to submit pre-recorded talks ahead of the meeting and to attend a live virtual Q&A session after their talks. Oral sessions during the meeting will therefore be a mix of predominantly live, in-person presentations and some pre-recorded presentations, presented to both the in-person and virtual audience. The symposium will thus be fully streamed for virtual attendees but social events taking place in Lyon will be for in-person attendees only.

To find out more, visit http://iso2022.univ-lyon1.fr/en

ICP14

Comments Off on ICP14
ICP14 logo

Dear Paleoceanography community and friends,

We are excited to announce that registration and abstract submission for ICP14 are now open! Please visit the ICP14 homepage for registration and lots more information about the conference.

We remain hopeful that we can arrange ICP14 as the vibrant conference it always is and only need to use the virtual component to broaden participation and opportunities for interaction. However, we keep monitoring the pandemic situation closely and will send further updates in case changes need to be made.

Important deadlines:

  • Early Bird registration: Feb 28, 2022
  • Travel /virtual participation grant application, including abstract submission for those applying: Feb 28, 2022
    • (Note: those applying for travel/virtual participation grants can register until April 20, 2022 at the early bird rate)
  • Abstract submission: April 3, 2022
  • All Presenters must register by April 20, 2022
  • Changes to participation mode (virtual/on-site) until April 20, 2022

The Scientific Committee is in the final stages of completing an exciting plenary program and we have ample space in the program for extended poster sessions. A range of field trips are planned to allow you to experience the fantastic glacially formed landscape surrounding Bergen.

You can also find an updated weather prediction on the website!

If you would like to organize a pre- or post-conference meeting or workshop in Bergen and need help with logistics, let us know at sec.icp14@uib.no. (please write “ICP14 workshops” in the subject line).

For the musicians among you, please sign up in the registration form to join the stage at the Paleomusicology concert. And finally, following tradition we are looking for hosts for ICP15, so please get in touch with us at sec.icp14@uib.no if you are interested in giving a pitch for hosting ICP in 2025.

Best regards,

The ICP14 local organizing committee

Cocco catch-up

Comments Off on Cocco catch-up

There will be a pre-christmas Cocco Catch-up on the 14th December on Zoom. More details can be found on the event page.

TMS Foraminifera Festival

Comments Off on TMS Foraminifera Festival

We are delighted to invite you to the TMS Foraminifera Festival: a virtual foram-themed day of talks and posters on Friday 27th August, 06:00-16:30 UTC (07:00-17:30 BST) taking place on Zoom. The Festival features four sessions of talks (15 min) and posters, each convened by a group of 4-5 early career researchers.

Provisional schedule

SessionTime (UTC)SpeakerTitle
Session 106:00Intro to Foram Festival Session 1
06:05Dharma Andrea Reyes MacayaCarbon isotopes in modern Southeast Pacific Benthic Foraminifera: Paleoceanographic implications
06:20Takashi ToyofukuLittle by little Foraminifera laboratory culture goes far
06:35Lukas JonkersLarge variability in Neogloboquadrina pachyderma stable isotope ratios from isothermal conditions: implications for single foraminifera analysis
06:50Jennifer ScottMonsoon evolution in the western Arabian Sea: insights into hemispheric controls and temperature evolution over the last 120 ka BP
07:05Eleanor JohnKeynote: TBC
07:20Flavia Boscolo-GalazzoKeynote: Matches and mismatches of Mg/Ca and δ18O in planktonic foraminifera: a multispecies comparison through time and across space
07:35BREAK
08:00Poster Session
08:30Break-out A
Session 209:00Intro to Foram Festival Session 2
09:05Giulia MargaritelliKeynote: Planktonic foraminifera and climate changes: the last 2000 years
09:20Mónica Bolívar FericheCorrelation of planktonic and shallow-benthic zonations in a middle Miocene succession from SE Spain
09:35Louise CallardVirtual foraminifera: using eSlide for online microfossil identification
09:50Allison HsiangAutomated community ecology of planktonic foraminifera using deep learning
10:05Anieke Brombacher3Dforam: an R package to analyse shell growth in 3 dimensions
10:20BREAK
10:35General Poster Session
11:05BREAK
Session 311:30Intro to Foram Festival Session 3
11:35Haruka TakagiKeynote: Advances in planktonic foraminiferal photosymbiosis research: Partnership, photophysiology, and implications on evolution
11:50Rikza Nur Faqih An NaharStudy of the September 28th 2018 Tsunamigenic Landslide Deposits in Palu, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia Based on Foraminifera Data
12:05Johanna SchmidtHow to distinguish contourites and turbidites using benthic foraminifera
12:20James MulqueeneyAssessing the impact of climate change on the structural integrity of benthic foraminifera during the Palaeocene Eocene Thermal Maximum – implications for future climate change
12:35Kate DarlingNot seeing the wood for the trees: A case for obligate alternation of generation in non-spinose planktonic foraminifera
12:50Daniel E. GaskellCO2 capture explains δ13C vital effects in foraminifera
Session 413:05Poster Session
13:35Break-out B
14:05Intro to Foram Festival Session 4
14:10Sulia GoetingDiversity and depth distribution of modern benthic foraminifera offshore Brunei Darussalam
14:25Anna SaupeBiogeographic patterns of benthic foraminifera in contourite drift systems of the high-latitude North Atlantic Ocean
14:40Maxime DavirayEcology of benthic foraminifera in a mudflat subjected to cable bacterial activity
14:55Tiago Menezes FreirePaleoceanographic conditions through MIS 4 in the mid-latitude Western South Atlantic based on planktonic Foraminifera
15:10Yahel EshedBenthic foraminifera associated with seagrass as a model ecosystem for monitoring environmental changes
15:25Abduljamiu Olalekan AmaoKeynote: The future of benthic foraminiferal diversity in the Arabian Gulf: a system under pressure from climate change
15:40BREAK
Awards Ceremony16:05Awards for best poster and talk

We look forward to e-meeting you in August,

The Foraminifera Festival Coordinators

Dr. Anieke Brombacher (University of Southampton, TMS Events Secretary)
Dr. Babette Hoogakker (Heriot-Watt University, TMS Foraminifera Group Chair)
Dr. Lyndsey Fox (Kingston University, TMS Foraminifera Group Secretary)
Dr. Manuel Weinkauf (Charles University in Prague, TMS Newsletter Editor)
Dr. Rehemat Bhatia (TMS Publicity Officer)

Cocco Catch-Up

Comments Off on Cocco Catch-Up

TMS Nannofossil Group ‘Cocco Catch-Up’, hosted from University College London

Thursday, 22nd July 2021 from 13:30 UK time (12:30 UTC).

We are pleased to annouce that the next TMS Nannofossil Group ‘Cocco Catch-Up’ has now been rescheduled for Thursday 22nd July 2021, starting at 13:30 UK time (12:30 UTC). It will be taking place virtually. We hope that you are able to attend. We are delighted to present an excellent programme of talks and are certain that these will stimulate lots of valuable discussion. Please find a brief outline of the schedule below.

All times stated are for the UK – these are provided for guidance but timings may vary on the day.

13:30 Welcome (speakers, please join us from 13:10 to set up)

13:35 Ros Rickaby, Oxford University: Placing pelagic coccolithophores in the long term carbon cycle

14:15 Deborah Tangunan, Cardiff University: Subtropical biotic response during the early Pliocene warmth

14:45 Alan Maria Mancini, University of Turin: An opportunity to discuss ‘coccolithophores in low salinity environments’

15:05 10 minute break

15:15 Mariem Saavedra Pellitero, University of Birmingham: Distribution of coccoliths in surface sediments across the Drake Passage and calcification of Emiliania huxleyi morphotypes

15:45 Amy Jones, University of Birmingham: Macroevolutionary drivers of coccolithophores during Neogene cooling

16:15 Jeremy Young, University College London (with Baptiste Sucheras-Marx and Shijun Jiang): INA/Nannotax Bibliography project – toward a comprehensive bibliography of nanno literature.

16:45 General discussion/social/wrap up.

17:00 Close

Please note that by joining the Zoom meeting you agree to adhere to the TMS Code of Conduct.

Zoom call details:

https://ucl.zoom.us/j/91716745717

Meeting ID: 917 1674 5717

NannoTalks Volume 2

Comments Off on NannoTalks Volume 2

The International Nannoplankton Association (INA) is happy to announce NannoTalks Volume 2, starting Monday 19th April at 15:00 UTC. Tune in to our transmission on YouTube:

Our first talk will be the Role of silicon in the development of complex crystal shapes in coccolithophores by Gerald Langer. The development of calcification by the coccolithophores had a profound impact on ocean carbon cycling, but the evolutionary steps leading to the formation of these complex biomineralized structures are not clear. Advanced microscopic studies help to understand how these tiny microorganisms calcify and how some coccolithophore species recruit silicon for crystal morphogenesis.

Microfossil Image Competition 2021

Comments Off on Microfossil Image Competition 2021

Diatoms are tiny, silica-shelled phytoplankton. Not only are they an important part of marine ecosystems and useful tools for studying past climate – this Asteromphalus flabellatus proves that they are also amazingly beautiful!

The Micropalaeontological Society is delighted to announce the winner of the 2020 Micropalaeontology Image Competition!

The overall image winner was submitted by Isabel Dove from the University of Rhode Island – Graduate School of Oceanography, with a beautiful image of the diatom species Asteromphalus flabellatus. Not only does Isabel win the competition’s first prize of €200, but her image is also included on the front cover of our TMSoc2021 Calendar (note these are now sold out)!

On behalf of the Society we would like to congratulate Isabel on her success. Eleven additional winners were selected from the fantastic submissions, and are on display below! A wide variety of microfossils and imaging techniques have been championed this year, and we are already looking forward to next year’s competition.

Additional winners

Odysseas Archontikis and Jeremy Young, University of Oxford and University College London

Coccolith ultrastructure of Cyclicargolithus floridanus. Each coccolith is composed of two interconnecting cycles of the same crystal units, known as the R-units. Coccosphere specimen is c. 10μm in diameter and was collected from Early Miocene dark sapropelic sediments.

Hilary H. Birks, University of Bergen, Norway

Seed of mountain chickweed, Cerastium cerastoides. This creeping arctic-alpine plant bears large white chickweed flowers, characteristic of its family, Caryophyllaceae. It grows in seepage zones from melting snowbeds usually in open gravel or stones. The bean-shaped seeds, about 1.5 mm long, have an amazing pattern of humpy interlocking cells.
Seed of sea campion, Silene maritima. The grey-leaved plants form loose mats and bear large white flowers typical of its family, Caryophyllaceae. It inhabits sea-cliffs, seaside walls, shingle banks, and drift-lines on seashores. Its bean-shaped seeds, about 2 mm long, have an amazing pattern of interlocking jig-saw cells

Damián Cárdenas, Missouri University of Science and Technology

Catching a glimpse of organic-walled microfossils

Dimitris Evangelinos, Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra – CSIC – Universidad de Granada

Diatom buried in calcareous nannofossils

Sahina Gazi, National Centre for Polar and Ocean Research, India

Calcareous Nannofossils from the Indian Sector of Southern Ocean

Hannah Hartung, University of Cologne

Look, which surprise: a baby-like Radiolaria in the belly of its mother

Susan Richardson, Florida Atlantic University

Slice through shell of an ancient foraminiferan Rauserella erratica. Image shows the discoidal shape of the early shell which results from regular coiling in a single plane. In later stages, the shell becomes uncoiled as the axis of coiling shift. Shells collected from reef-associated habitats in Permian-aged rocks of North America.

Mariem Saavedra-Pellitero, University of Birmingham

During COVID-19 lockdown, I experienced a great personal tragedy. I drew these two coccospheres of Emiliania huxleyi (type A and type O) to cheer myself up. I hope this watercolor will bring a smile to others.

Nicolai Schleinkofer, Goethe University, Frankfurt

Parasitic foraminifera (Hyrokkin sarcophaga) on host organism (Acesta excavata, bivalve). The bored hole is visible as well as the defense reaction of the bivalve (callus formation to close the boring)

Yan Yu Ting, Earth Observatory of Singapore

A showcase of nature’s meticulous design skills – a handful of tropical benthic foraminifera imaged at various angles using microscope.