The Micropalaeontological Society

All posts in Foraminifera

Foram-Nanno 2018, 22nd June 2018, Edinburgh & St Andrews

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The deadline for registration and abstract submission has been extended to 23.59pm, 18th May

The next Foraminifera and Nannofossil spring meeting will be hosted at the University of Edinburgh to coincide with the FORAMS2018 conference.

The theme for the 1 day meeting will be: Reconstructing past ocean environments with foraminifera and nannofossils

Foraminifera and nannofossils are extremely useful to academic and industrial micropaleontology as proxies for palaeoenvironmental, palaeoceanographic and palaeoclimatic research. Their abundance, presence in virtually all marine environments, and sensitivity to environmental alterations make them ideal recorders of past oceans and climate change. In this session we invite contributions (posters and talks) from micropalaeontologists working on nannofossils and fossil foraminiferal communities to highlight their use as tracers and to reconstruct environments of the past.

Lunch and refreshments will be provided throughout the day, and attendees of the TMsoc meeting will also be able to take part in the FORAMS2018 sessions and discussions held on the 22nd and vice versa.

FORAMS2018 attendees are also able to submit an additional abstract free of charge to the TMS session.

We particularly encourage abstracts from Nannofossil workers and Early Career researchers.

More details about travel and accommodation in Edinburgh can be found via the FORAMS2018 website.

Microfossil Image Competition & Calendar 2018

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Buy a Calendar

The Micropalaeontological Society is delighted to announce the winner of this year’s Micropalaeontology Image Competition!

The overall image winner was submitted by Adam David Woodhouse from the University of Leeds, with his beautiful image of the planktonic foraminifera Acarinina praetopilensis from the Eocene equatorial Pacific. The image clearly displays the heavy recrystallistion of the foram test and the adherence of calcareous nannofossils with large muricae projecting through coccolith debris. The main image diameter c. 150 µm, and the image to be used within the calendar (August) will include an image of the complete foram (c. 400 µm diameter) for context. Not only does Adam win the competition’s first prize of €200, but also has his image included on the front cover of out TMSoc2018 Calendar (see above)!

On behalf of the Society we would like to congratulate Adam on his success. Eleven additional winners were selected from the fantastic submissions, and are on display below! A wide variety of microfossils and imaging techniques have been championed this year, and we are already looking forward to next year’s competition. Read more

Lyell Meeting 2018: Mass extinctions, 8th March 2018, London

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The study of mass extinctions is one of the most interdisciplinary research areas within Earth and environmental sciences. Recent, major advances have come from a broad spectrum of fields, including atmospheric modelling, high-precision age dating, volcanology, geochemistry, stratigraphy and palaeontology.

The 2018 Lyell Meeting aims to highlight these achievements and showcases the improved understanding we now have of the great environmental catastrophes of the past. The Meeting aims to encompass the full spectrum of crises seen in the Phanerozoic fossil record.

The 2018 Lyell Meeting provides a platform to assess the current stratigraphic and geochemical records of environmental change during mass extinction events and the role of atmospheric climate modelling in understanding the causes of the crises. The goal is to evaluate the relative importance of environmental changes in major episodes of species extinctions, and to further explore the mechanisms that link these proximal kill mechanisms to the ultimate drivers, such as large igneous province eruptions and meteorite impacts.

This will be a rare opportunity to hear research developments happening in diverse disciplines applied to all mass extinction events.

Abstract deadline: 1st December 2017

More info at The Geological Society webpage

 

Change of Journal Publisher (Copernicus Publications)

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We are delighted to announce The Micropalaeontological Society has signed a new deal with Copernicus Publications (http://publications.copernicus.org) to publish the Journal of Micropalaeontology (JoM). After many fantastic years with the Geological Society Publishing House (GSPH), the Society’s contract with GSPH was due for renewal at the end of 2017 and through negotiations with a number of potential publishers (including GSPH) we aimed to increase Open Access publishing. After considerable discussions the committee decided that Copernicus would be our first choice as publisher of JoM from 1st January 2018 onwards, for a three-year period in the first instance. This means that JoM is now the first entirely Open Access journal in micropalaeontology. This arrangement does not affect our agreement with GSPH for the delivery of TMS Special Publications. The new platform is now set up within the Copernicus website and can be viewed here:

http://journal-of-micropalaeontology.net/index.html

Manuscript submission is now open, and we have developed a promotion for authors without funding that will start in 2018 (see below)!

There is a lot of information to disseminate that relates to: (1) how the new journal approach differs to GSPH, and (2) how this new model will be of benefit to TMS members and indeed our micropalaeontology community as a whole. Here, we will try and summarise many of the key changes that will result from this new contract with Copernicus. In addition, there is a pdf of ‘Frequently Asked Questions’ (FAQ’s), attached to this email.

More information and FAQ download:

Microfossil Image Competition 2017

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Image Comp Poster 2017

2017 will be the third year The Micropalaeontological Society runs their Microfossil Image Competition. The outstanding success of the last two years is reflected by the creation of our 2015, 2016 and 2017 Micropalaeontology Calendars. Each year, the calendars have required two print runs and have sold out! A summary of the winning images can be found here (20142015 2016), whilst a Flickr archive of all submitted images can be found here. Read more

Foram Nanno 2017, 19th-21st June 2017, Birmingham

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ForamNanno2016Banner

The TMS is delighted to announce that the next Foraminifera and Nannofossil spring meeting will be hosted by the University of Birmingham on the 19-21st June 2017.The program will encompass oral presentations and extended posters sessions, an icebreaker reception in the Lapworth Museum of Geology, a conference dinner, as well as an optional field excursion and thematic workshops on Monday 19th June.

The theme for this year’s event is “Life in a Changing Ocean”. We strongly encourage submissions that address the vulnerability and resilience of foraminifera and coccolithophores to environmental change, past and present, as well as the interaction between changing marine environments and evolutionary processes and patterns over long timescales. Read more

1st International Summer School on Benthic Foraminifera, July 2nd-7th 2017, Angers

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FRESCO_2017_Banner

The LPG-BIAF is delighted to announce that the first FRESCO Summer school will be held on July 2nd to 7th, 2017 at Angers University (France).

The course is intended for students/researchers interested in Living benthic foraminifera in coastal environments

If you want to apply to the summer school, please complete the form and email it to fresco@univ-angers.fr before the 3rd of March, 2017. Read more

Foram-Nanno 2017, 19th-21st June, Birmingham

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SAVE THE DATE – TMS Foram & Nanno meeting 19th-21st June 2017 at the University of Birmingham, UK

We are delighted that we are able to welcome you all to the University of Birmingham from the 19th – 21st June 2017 for the Foraminiferal and Calcareous Nannofossil meeting. The proposed schedule is below
  • Sunday 18th and Monday 19th June – Workshops (Saturday if necessary)
  • Evening of Monday 19th June – Meeting Icebreaker
  • Tuesday 20th and Wednesday 21st June – Main Meeting
  • Thursday 22nd June – Field-trip
If you would like to run a workshop prior to this meeting then please get in touch with Kirsty for foram related queries (k.m.edgar@bham.ac.uk) or Tom Dunkley Jones for nanno queries (t.dunkleyjones@bham.ac.uk) to discuss arrangements. Please note that we have >20 each of stereo light microscopes and transmitted light microscopes available for use if you would like to run a practical workshop.
More details to follow later this year.
Best wishes, Kirsty and Tom
Your 2017 TMS F&N conference organisers

FORAMS 2018, 23rd-24 June 2018, Edinburgh & St Andrews

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There is also a 1 day conference on the 22nd June, for Foram-Nanno-2108. Registration deadline, 18th May. More details here.

Reconstructing past ocean environments with foraminifera

Conveners: Lyndsey Fox, Kirsty Edgar, Martin Langer

FORAMS 2018, which will take place in Edinburgh (symposium) and St Andrews (workshops) in June 2018.

Foraminifera are extremely useful to academic and industrial micropaleontology as proxies for palaeoenvironmental, palaeoceanographic and palaeoclimatic research. Their abundance, presence in virtually all marine environments, and sensitivity to environmental alterations make them ideal recorders of past oceans and climate change. In this session we invite contributions (posters and talks) from micropalaeontologists working on fossil foraminiferal communities to highlight their use as tracers and to reconstruct environments of the past.

Full details and registration available on the Official Website